POST HARVEST –  PRODUCT INTEGRITY through the CHAIN PROGRAMME

HORTGROscience 2014 Product Integrity through the Chain (Post-Harvest) Programme is managed by Richard Hurndall

The essence of this programme is to support and enhance the processes across the supply-chain to ensure that intrinsic product integrity is maintained, and that a quality product is available to the end-consumer in local and distant global markets. The objective of this Investment Focus Area (IFA) is to increase the marketable tons of fruit delivered per ton of fruit loaded.

The themes of this programme include:

  • Protocols and fruit quality maintenance
  • Storage techniques
  • Market access
  • Decay control
  • Fruit quality prediction
  • Chemical residue reduction/alternatives
  • Packaging
  • Transportation systems

For handling protcols of stone fruit, click here: http://www.hortgro.co.za/production-techical-information/technical-information/handling-protocols/stone-fruit/

The PACKHOUSE ACTION GROUP also falls under Richard’s programme. It conducts projects and seminars for the benefit of packhouses.To learn more, click here: http://www.hortgro.co.za/production-techical-information/packhouse-action-group-pag/

STONE FRUIT

Fungicides from the soil

Bacillus micro-organisms living in the very soil where crops are grown were put to the test and proofed to produce ingenious weapons for the effective control of diseases and mould on fruit.

Read PHI article 

Setting the CATTS among the pests

CATTS on its own is not enough to send internal and external pests packing, but in combination with other post-harvest treatments it can give Japanese plums the protection they require.

Read PHI article 

Moisture maketh the nectarine

When nectarines lose their moisture, it is not only their looks that suffer. Marketability disappears into thin air as well.

Read PHI article 

Smart solution to plum conundrum

What to do when you know your export plums arrive at their best when stored at different temperatures during shipping, but your overseas market dictates a strict one-size-fits-all cold-steri approach? You turn to science for answers.

Read PHI article 

Come out, come out, wherever you are!

New findings reveal that early detection and quantification of Botrytis cinerea in plums and weeds in the orchard may be key to optimise decay control.

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What breaks a plum’s heart?

When plum stones split apart, the financial consequences are enough to break the bank for producers. A PHI-supported study has made inroads into understanding the broken stone mystery, and giving the industry tools to manage it.

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Technology transfer goes online

Knowledge becomes truly powerful when it is shared and applied – which is what the ARRIE-App hopes to achieve.

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INFOGRAPHIC: Plum Market Ripening Protocol
Plums are grown mainly in South Africa for the export market. The full potential of taste can therefore only be realised by reducing the acid levels after harvest. The key to this: Cold storage temperature. It is vital that growers, marketers and retailers work together to ensure that plums with a good eating quality are on sale on the market. See our infographic explaining how..PLUMripeningFINAL  
FORCED AIR COOLING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SELECTED SEA EXPORT PLUM CULTIVARS
Plums exported from South Africa to overseas markets require effective cold storage management to ensure optimum maintenance of fruit quality.
DOCUMENTS:
Forced-air cooling recommendations for selected sea export plum cultivars.DOC (355.5 KB)
PLUM VARIETY GUIDELINE
PLUM VARIETY GUIDELINE – STONE FRUIT INDUSTRY OPINION (Version 03/08/05)
DOCUMENTS:
Plum variety guideline.PDF (49.7 KB)
RECOMMENDED SUPPORT PROCEDURES AND HANDLING PROTOCOLS
In order to maintain the quality of stone fruit, responsible orchard practices are expected from each producer. Adequate guides and advice are available to assist producers meet this goal.
DOCUMENTS:
Recommended support procedures and handling protocols.PDF (242.3 KB)